hawkeyepics

A short bio (or self-justification!)

This is a selection of some of the images I have acquired and created over the last 10 or so years. I started in photography, like most, with a black and white Instamatic. In the 70's, I developed and printed my own black and white, and then some colour prints from slides. Again, like most, I have a collection of thousands of slides, most of which will never see the light of day, unless I get motivated to review, cull and scan, I suspect more cull than scan. With the advent of the digital revolution in photography,  it is easy to review and cull at and just after the moment of capture, rather than waiting to get home and get the prints or slides back from the processer. Digital also makes it easier to share images, via websites like this, flash drives to review at leisure, and self-published coffee table books. Anything but the dreaded slide nights from the 60's and 70's.

Currently, I use Nikon cameras and lens, with aid from the Lumix point & shoot LX5. I also have a box of obsolete Nikons, Minoltas, various lenses and a venerable Rolleiflex T. Over the last 10 years, I have been lucky enough to visit the Antarctic and Arctic many times, and hope that other people will get as much enjoyment from these images as I have. Home is on the sub-tropical coast of Queensland, hence some images of beaches and sunshine.

Some people say that if your image needs a caption, you've failed to make a decent image. However, sometimes, it's useful to know the time and place, and some history behind the image. As I get time, I shall try and add captions if I think they may be helpful.

Hawkeye.

PS I shall use the space at right for my Image of the Week, and after a week or so, will then file it in the IotW folder. (Browse>Galleries).

PPS I've recently had some time to spare and have started refiling all my old slides, a mish-mash of Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Agfa slide film, taken from the late 70's onwards. The Kodachrome has preserved the best, followed by the Ektachrome. When I find a lost masterpiece, I shall scan it and display as an IotW, at right.


Canopy contours.

Looking up in the forest at Strahan on the west coast of Tasmania gives an indication of the struggle for light and canopy space between the various trees. They seem to maintain a 'no man's land' space between adjacent trees.

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